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Why I like Lil B: A Review

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  • Why I like Lil B: A Review
    Posted by  
    June 30, 2011

    I have a problem. It's something that I noticed a while ago and I think its something that has to do with my introduction to a wide array of musical genres as a child. My problem is is that it's really really hard for me to dislike music. I have such an appreciation for it in all its forms that I sometimes find myself listening to a schizophrenic range of sounds in the whip or on the iPod. You really have to go out of your way for me to just completely despise what someone creates musically. Now in the midst of this self-awareness I have discovered there is a certain context within music that I gravitate to more than others and that context is something that I have defined for myself as "Liberation Rock". It can be described as music that is subversive, revolutionary, political, challenges the status quo, mostly positive and even militaristic. A few examples of this would be "Know Your Rights" by The Clash, "Politik Kills" by Manu Chao, "Gentleman" by Fela Kuti, "Do It Like A G-O" by The Geto Boys, "Confrontation" by Damian Marley, "Rush Of Blood To The Head" by Coldplay, "Everyman For Himself" by Billy Blue, "In One Ear" by Cage The Elephant, "The Catalyst" by Linkin Park, "Strange Fruit" by Billie Holiday and the list goes on. I guess up against my political and social upbringing songs and artists like these strike a chord with me. Now this affinity for "Liberation Rock" doesn't negate or take away from songs and artists that don't necessarily fall under that personal category for me. Dependent on the environment, I have the uncanny ability to sit and universally enjoy whatever is coming through the speakers at almost any given time. But songs that express the qualities of my very own genre of "Liberation Rock" definitely get more burn in the system by far. And as it happens through their music I develop an interest in the artist him or herself. Sometimes the journey into the world of the artist outside of the music they create can be fruitless and even disheartening. Quite literally your hero's musically can be real assholes or morons in almost every other facet. But in all honesty that is a rare occasion. And even sometimes it's the inverse and the personality and mentality of the artist outweighs the music they create and the person becomes more of an interest than his or her art. In regards to Lil B I must admit I'm somewhere in the middle of those extremes.

    Before we get any deeper let me put my inherent biases on the table. First, I blindly and unconsciously love anything that comes out of the Bay Area of Northern California. It's part honest respect for the cultural products that emerge out of that region and part happiness and empathy that in the midst of the social turmoil and raw violence and despair that has plagued that area for decades that artists reppin' the Bay are capable to create and express themselves at all. I have the same appreciation for artists that carve out a name for themselves in Detroit and New Orleans. Second, my faith is in the youth. So I find myself constantly observing and trying to empower and support the youth in any way that I can. No matter what they create. Through the youth expressing themselves you have a golden opportunity to communicate and gain a new perspective on the ever changing world around us. It's a beautiful thing.

    So Lil B is from The Bay and he's a youth hahaha we can stop right here! He already good in my book. But what gets Lil B admission into my coveted genre of "Liberation Rock" is his absolute lack of fear when it comes to challenging the status quo. Whether it be in hip-hop, which is very elitist and caste and class oriented, or just society in general, which is very elitist and class centric. His albeit "rocky" road musically has been honestly at times unbearable to walk on. Some of Lil B's past works have been underwhelming to say the least and at moments I would seriously consider heading out for smoother pavement. But every now and again an absolute jewel would come to the surface and I'd find myself unable to fathom leaving this kids side for any reason. The vulgar lyrics, happy go lucky cooking dances and sometimes pointless stream of conscious style rambling started to give way to hints of a deadly serious revolutionary mentality lurking underneath. Now I'm not talking Dead Prez or Immortal Technique level stuff here but something just as powerful and meaningful. What I was witnessing was a man in the process of profound self-realization and self-awareness. And seeing that this road has led to the promised land in the form of "I'm Gay (I'm Happy)" has been for me just as fulfilling as the new understandings that I'm sure Lil Bars has come upon if the content of his new album is anything to go by.

    First let me make something abundantly clear, the title "I'm Gay (I'm Happy)" I think is absolute genius. Those two words together side by side in almost any format in the society we live in can be a cultural and social death sentence. And in many places in the world (even here in the good ole' US of A) they can mean an ACTUAL death sentence. I'm talking a shanked in the shower, beat with a bat, beheaded on Friday kinda death. The best and rarest of braveries is bravery in the face of death. Let's be honest Lil B's album probably won't even be commercially released in certain countries because of the title alone. I just wish he did a song called "James Baldwin" and I would've loved to see you twitter-lectuals and goon rules street professors argue against one of the foremost, prominent black intellectual radicals the world has ever known who just so happened to be an overt homosexual but repped the ghettos of Harlem harder than Nicky Barnes and Rich Porter combined and took the struggles and achievements of the black and impoverished experience and intellectually and dazzlingly rubbed it all in the pasty face of the oppressive power structures of the time and this time as well! I wish a nigga would!!! Don't matter if your gay, that's between you and your religion. All I care about is if your down for the cause. Which a LOT of hetero's ain't. Go figure. Now the doper thing about the title is that it exposed the raw power of words and reinforces the concept that "perception is king" in a very simple and even remedial use of homonym (no pun intended but you gotta chalk that up as a mean double entendre!) The word "gay" referring to homosexuality in the minds of the "guilty" ,as well call them here, sent shockwaves throughout our hip-hop community. Making Lil B the target of attack and ridicule. But Lil B's ultimate intention and preference for the word "gay" was its "one who is happy" definition. So basically my lil homey was being attacked for being happy. The poetic justice in that is awe inspiring. If that don't speak to the conditions that exist in this world and this society I don't know what does. Hate on somebody simply because they are happy or have found happiness. How many of us are innocent of that injustice? Not many. Including me at times. Now whether Lil B did that on purpose or not is really not an issue because the reality of someone (that would be me by the way) interpreting and analyzing his album title that deeply gives merit to his action regardless of his initial intent. I mean it is HIS album title.

    I won't carry on much longer but I did want to get to the content. Now normally reviewers delve deeply or comparatively lightly when talking about an album. They mention favorite songs or less than favorites for that matter, maybe even breaking them down and bringing finer points of production or lyrical execution to light. Well I'm not going to mess about with any of that. At the end of the day it's all opinion and one man's trash is another man's treasure. If you like it you like it if you don't you don't. The reason I give this album entrance into my "Liberation Rock" library hangs on the power and impact of just one single, solitary line uttered by Lil B in the midst of the entire work that is "I'm Gay". And that line is:

    "The Hood Is A Lie!"

    The modern processes of life experienced that would culminate in a 21 year old African American male who more than likely is a direct descendant of slaves, raised in a consumerist and corrupt society dominated by inequality, fear, system-trust and self-doubt, coming from a region of the country that is notoriously violent and self-destructive (to this day I still can't believe The Tenderloin exists in these modern times), that more than likely has buried friends and seen raw poverty in the land of plenty, that has received a subpar education and has been profiled and downgraded even before the day of his birth on this soil, teased with excess and a little bit of the "good life" for the price of ones morals, freedom and even life itself, in the face of all that for him to say with confidence and surety that:

    "The Hood Is A Lie!"

    speaks louder to me than the best, most well-timed, Just Blaze produced and Hype Williams directed punchline any rapper can think of! You can't buy that type of provocative, chilling social commentary. You have to live that. Furthermore it commands respect, and not that phony ass "48 Laws Of Power" "saw it on Gangland" respect either. I mean that Malcolm Martin Luther Junior respect. And if the youths are making these types of statements in these times and in the midst of all that is against them I have no choice but to be Gay (Happy) too!!!

    So there you have it. I like Lil B.

    Sincerely and with a gangsta ass "I-Wish-A-Nigga-Would" attitude,

    Wasalu "Lupe Fiasco" Jaco

    P.S. His album cover is better than yours too!

    Filed under:
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Lupe Fiasco's picture
on June 30, 2011

I have a problem. It's something that I noticed a while ago and I think its something that has to do with my introduction to a wide array of musical genres as a child. My problem is is that it's really really hard for me to dislike music. I have such an appreciation for it in all its forms that I sometimes find myself listening to a schizophrenic range of sounds in the whip or on the iPod. You really have to go out of your way for me to just completely despise what someone creates musically. Now in the midst of this self-awareness I have discovered there is a certain context within music that I gravitate to more than others and that context is something that I have defined for myself as "Liberation Rock". It can be described as music that is subversive, revolutionary, political, challenges the status quo, mostly positive and even militaristic. A few examples of this would be "Know Your Rights" by The Clash, "Politik Kills" by Manu Chao, "Gentleman" by Fela Kuti, "Do It Like A G-O" by The Geto Boys, "Confrontation" by Damian Marley, "Rush Of Blood To The Head" by Coldplay, "Everyman For Himself" by Billy Blue, "In One Ear" by Cage The Elephant, "The Catalyst" by Linkin Park, "Strange Fruit" by Billie Holiday and the list goes on. I guess up against my political and social upbringing songs and artists like these strike a chord with me. Now this affinity for "Liberation Rock" doesn't negate or take away from songs and artists that don't necessarily fall under that personal category for me. Dependent on the environment, I have the uncanny ability to sit and universally enjoy whatever is coming through the speakers at almost any given time. But songs that express the qualities of my very own genre of "Liberation Rock" definitely get more burn in the system by far. And as it happens through their music I develop an interest in the artist him or herself. Sometimes the journey into the world of the artist outside of the music they create can be fruitless and even disheartening. Quite literally your hero's musically can be real assholes or morons in almost every other facet. But in all honesty that is a rare occasion. And even sometimes it's the inverse and the personality and mentality of the artist outweighs the music they create and the person becomes more of an interest than his or her art. In regards to Lil B I must admit I'm somewhere in the middle of those extremes.

Before we get any deeper let me put my inherent biases on the table. First, I blindly and unconsciously love anything that comes out of the Bay Area of Northern California. It's part honest respect for the cultural products that emerge out of that region and part happiness and empathy that in the midst of the social turmoil and raw violence and despair that has plagued that area for decades that artists reppin' the Bay are capable to create and express themselves at all. I have the same appreciation for artists that carve out a name for themselves in Detroit and New Orleans. Second, my faith is in the youth. So I find myself constantly observing and trying to empower and support the youth in any way that I can. No matter what they create. Through the youth expressing themselves you have a golden opportunity to communicate and gain a new perspective on the ever changing world around us. It's a beautiful thing.

So Lil B is from The Bay and he's a youth hahaha we can stop right here! He already good in my book. But what gets Lil B admission into my coveted genre of "Liberation Rock" is his absolute lack of fear when it comes to challenging the status quo. Whether it be in hip-hop, which is very elitist and caste and class oriented, or just society in general, which is very elitist and class centric. His albeit "rocky" road musically has been honestly at times unbearable to walk on. Some of Lil B's past works have been underwhelming to say the least and at moments I would seriously consider heading out for smoother pavement. But every now and again an absolute jewel would come to the surface and I'd find myself unable to fathom leaving this kids side for any reason. The vulgar lyrics, happy go lucky cooking dances and sometimes pointless stream of conscious style rambling started to give way to hints of a deadly serious revolutionary mentality lurking underneath. Now I'm not talking Dead Prez or Immortal Technique level stuff here but something just as powerful and meaningful. What I was witnessing was a man in the process of profound self-realization and self-awareness. And seeing that this road has led to the promised land in the form of "I'm Gay (I'm Happy)" has been for me just as fulfilling as the new understandings that I'm sure Lil Bars has come upon if the content of his new album is anything to go by.

First let me make something abundantly clear, the title "I'm Gay (I'm Happy)" I think is absolute genius. Those two words together side by side in almost any format in the society we live in can be a cultural and social death sentence. And in many places in the world (even here in the good ole' US of A) they can mean an ACTUAL death sentence. I'm talking a shanked in the shower, beat with a bat, beheaded on Friday kinda death. The best and rarest of braveries is bravery in the face of death. Let's be honest Lil B's album probably won't even be commercially released in certain countries because of the title alone. I just wish he did a song called "James Baldwin" and I would've loved to see you twitter-lectuals and goon rules street professors argue against one of the foremost, prominent black intellectual radicals the world has ever known who just so happened to be an overt homosexual but repped the ghettos of Harlem harder than Nicky Barnes and Rich Porter combined and took the struggles and achievements of the black and impoverished experience and intellectually and dazzlingly rubbed it all in the pasty face of the oppressive power structures of the time and this time as well! I wish a nigga would!!! Don't matter if your gay, that's between you and your religion. All I care about is if your down for the cause. Which a LOT of hetero's ain't. Go figure. Now the doper thing about the title is that it exposed the raw power of words and reinforces the concept that "perception is king" in a very simple and even remedial use of homonym (no pun intended but you gotta chalk that up as a mean double entendre!) The word "gay" referring to homosexuality in the minds of the "guilty" ,as well call them here, sent shockwaves throughout our hip-hop community. Making Lil B the target of attack and ridicule. But Lil B's ultimate intention and preference for the word "gay" was its "one who is happy" definition. So basically my lil homey was being attacked for being happy. The poetic justice in that is awe inspiring. If that don't speak to the conditions that exist in this world and this society I don't know what does. Hate on somebody simply because they are happy or have found happiness. How many of us are innocent of that injustice? Not many. Including me at times. Now whether Lil B did that on purpose or not is really not an issue because the reality of someone (that would be me by the way) interpreting and analyzing his album title that deeply gives merit to his action regardless of his initial intent. I mean it is HIS album title.

I won't carry on much longer but I did want to get to the content. Now normally reviewers delve deeply or comparatively lightly when talking about an album. They mention favorite songs or less than favorites for that matter, maybe even breaking them down and bringing finer points of production or lyrical execution to light. Well I'm not going to mess about with any of that. At the end of the day it's all opinion and one man's trash is another man's treasure. If you like it you like it if you don't you don't. The reason I give this album entrance into my "Liberation Rock" library hangs on the power and impact of just one single, solitary line uttered by Lil B in the midst of the entire work that is "I'm Gay". And that line is:

"The Hood Is A Lie!"

The modern processes of life experienced that would culminate in a 21 year old African American male who more than likely is a direct descendant of slaves, raised in a consumerist and corrupt society dominated by inequality, fear, system-trust and self-doubt, coming from a region of the country that is notoriously violent and self-destructive (to this day I still can't believe The Tenderloin exists in these modern times), that more than likely has buried friends and seen raw poverty in the land of plenty, that has received a subpar education and has been profiled and downgraded even before the day of his birth on this soil, teased with excess and a little bit of the "good life" for the price of ones morals, freedom and even life itself, in the face of all that for him to say with confidence and surety that:

"The Hood Is A Lie!"

speaks louder to me than the best, most well-timed, Just Blaze produced and Hype Williams directed punchline any rapper can think of! You can't buy that type of provocative, chilling social commentary. You have to live that. Furthermore it commands respect, and not that phony ass "48 Laws Of Power" "saw it on Gangland" respect either. I mean that Malcolm Martin Luther Junior respect. And if the youths are making these types of statements in these times and in the midst of all that is against them I have no choice but to be Gay (Happy) too!!!

So there you have it. I like Lil B.

Sincerely and with a gangsta ass "I-Wish-A-Nigga-Would" attitude,

Wasalu "Lupe Fiasco" Jaco

P.S. His album cover is better than yours too!

Comments

CSuSmith's picture

Speechless...... So profound
Superskunk's picture

It's a shame that notafan123 feels that way, a damn shame ! Obviously you don't know enough about Lupe's message or mission. I love Lupe as an artist and emcee, I don't feel alot of his songs musically, but dude's still got skills. And you know what, even though I don't feel sonme of his songs, I bump them anyway because his message is in his music if you pay attention, andit's a breath of fresh air that he's always got a positive message. Lupe is real hip-hop, but he also transcends hip-hop by speaking out against injustice worldwide. And the most amazing part about that man is that he's not doing it for himself, he's doing it for notafan123, you, me, and every human. I won't get into the fact that all organized religion is a farce, and your Bible and Quran are based on facts, but written as fiction. notafan123 needs to open his/her mind, I will reach out to the universal Qi in hoping that notafan123 will open his/her eyes and mind, and be guided to the straight path, the path of the people where everyone is equal and loved.
NotAFan123's picture

I am no longer a fan of Lupe Fiasco. I can't believe that he is supposedly a believer in Islam and has the audacity to back an album entitled "I'm Gay" from Lil B. I feel as though homosexuality is wrong and it is completely against the teachings of the Quran and the Bible. I can't begin to understand why Lupe would even say that Lil B's album title is absolute genius. I pray for God to guide Lupe to the straight path but I can no longer listen to his music because that would mean that I am providing a platform. A platform for Lupe to go against religious teachings by advocating to the youth that homosexuality is okay when it is not. I am really upset that Wasalu (Lupe Fiasco) Jaco would even go as far as expressing to his fans on his website that that type of behavior is acceptable. I believe that Lil B's music is garbage and like some else expressed before I believe that Lil B entitled his album "I'm Gay" for publicity. I also feel again for the second time that his music is garbage and I feel that his music isn't worth anyone's two sense.
Jamesmmm's picture

Dude: try Gregorian Chant!
Poliglota's picture

Lupe's words sparked curiosity within me. I was familiar with Lil B's "I'm Paris Hilton," and wrote him off as a less than sub par musician. Lil B's feature on Sorry 4 the Wait fascinated me, which I'm sure didn't have the same effect on anyone else. His wordplay was and is basic, yet there is a mysterious quality about him that is entertaining. After taking a closer look at Lil B's "Charlie Sheen," "Ellen Degeneres," and "Free Lil Wayne," I noticed two things: Lil B is bold, and he possesses a strange originality. If one can excuse his simple lyrics and inconsistent delivery, he will find a unique expression of artistic individuality (I know how unbelievable this sounds). The tracks I mentioned above are not about themselves, which is to say that they are more so a parody of current hip-hop than actual music to be appreciated. They are reflections of what people are attracted to within current hip-hop. Why else create a "Free Lil Wayne" as opposed to a "Free Lil Boosie?" This is an elaborate strategy to garner attention and provide entertainment that transcends the basic rules of rap: lyrics, delivery, punchlines, etc. Either you like that or you don't. Lil B's album is different than the music I mentioned above. The title certainly grabbed eyes and inflamed emotions. Despite this his music actually has meaning, "Back then, we was parted by the masters. Gave us religion so we couldn't move past it." Again, basic wordplay, yet his album (believe it or not) possesses some level of depth. There are also a few poetic lines, "Came from the top and hit the bottom, I never came from the bottom. That's just a facade, like seeing water in the desert. This song is depressin', but it's upliftin', holdin' on to my spirit." I didn't think him capable of that. I'm not attempting to convince anyone that Lil B is the next best thing because he isn't. He has his own lane, and there's more than meets the eye. As Lupe stated, "I like Lil B."
SmokeTactics's picture

BTW, we as a society are trapped; and now i'm thinkin' in the sucstance of this.... MIND OVER MATTER HOMIE, Materialism....even more so than politics in my mind traps us all....not me though If you haven;t already read this you shouLd Mark Booths: "The Secret History of America"; read that shit and you will feel one with the world all the while you take pleasure in gaining the knowledge the book offers, and if u aint wanna believe get a different book, but keep reading As i stated below, my friend pasted away unexpectedly over 2 years ago....I still remember his favorite quote: If you can't fly, run; if you can't run, walk; if you can't walk, crawl! Whatever you do and by all means, KEEP moving, enufff of my sappy shit, but i do wish he were here "continuing to move by all means forward in life with his family and kickin; it with me; stay real Lupe, don;t turn into one of the FUCK- hasbeen fake fucks doin; it for that cash aka LIL wayne, yeah his verses are nice, an hes gettin' paid, but he doin it for the wrong reasons....whats the point of havin all that money if u dont got love ones to spend it on ....ya diggg?
SmokeTactics's picture

IDK if you'll ever read this Wasalu, but MAN I CAN'T even BEGIN to express my enthusiasm, towards the art you have put down, all the while your label has restricted your free though and chained your soul to their requests....not even that...DEMANDS, Fuckin; Dickmunchers these days, i know what it feels like to work hard for a living and have people throw in their 2 cents if not a doller about the way you do you, even though they spew pure ignorant, uninformed BULLSHIT outta their mouths! I'm just sick of conversing with people on the jobs I do thinking they are better than me because they have a steady cashflow thet were
SmokeTactics's picture

given while i works for mine! PLease keep goin; hard on ur albums...i can tell u were restricted on Lasers, my boys even told me they heard that your Label fucked with ur flow and ur tryna break off a der asses; just know plenty of admirers like me, obviously not tryna sound like a battter for da other team, but U real talk and speak your mind_ aka DON:T EVER LET TEH SYSTEM TAKE AWAY YOUR .....FREEEEDOM, and you SPEEECH, everything that in turn makes you who you are, cuz ur music, although restricted til the next Album get cut and thrown into the world, helps me through NOT ALL, but a few hard times, man- That joint with John Legend makes me weep like a baby every time thinkin about my boy in the dirt; Made me realize "The good die Young" isn;t some BS proverb, cuz it happened to me, and until his apparation knocks on my door step i look to the stars and talk , until im up there with him wherever that may be I'lll stay BEAMIN'....just keep it real and fuck these clown ass bitches tryna restrict ur FLOW,,, break FREEEE Hommiee,,, break FREEEE!! BTW i know ur real, but this is my boy i mentioned, he overedosed on the SYSTEM's PILLZ, and they try and make him look like a fuckin' dirty Drugiee...HE was a Chemistry major and was smart as fuck, and it kills me that the news portrayed him how they did, they even showed him , and im tearin right now, they showed him bodybag wali put in the vid, fuck man...sorry i cant seee, just keep on doin you, its appreciated http://www.ketv.com/r/19695014/detail.html Even if ur not actaully viewing ur comments, this shit was as real to me and hits home as ur music does to ur soul,,, this im sure of 100 Percent!
cyclonethrill's picture

I too have a great deal of respect for music. Growing up as an assistant to my father, Djing at Spanish clubs I grew up listening to EVERYTHING (like salsa, son, rap, playero, merengue, bachata, classic rock, Beethoven, Lead Belly, Vladimir Horowitz, and so on...) I used to love anything that came from rap but once i started asking questions of why and how this world came about in a political and social aspect i started hating rap songs that would promote things like "fancy expensive cars" which they do not make any money from. I used to the rap game has changed and now they're just commercials for cars, money, clubs,and liquor, but I realized there's artist out there with a different agenda like yourself Lupe, and I love it, you just have to seek, omit what don't benefit others in a positive way, and know your freedom of ears listening to what YOU want to listen to not what the "media" want you to listen to.
MuslimahInTheHouse's picture

You know, I've never really liked rap, even hated it sometimes. The only time I'll listen is when lupe raps. I don't know exactly how to describe it, but you got it man. haha this sounds weird coming from a little girl XD but I mean it. :)
Niyaz's picture

Variety is the spice of life. I think everyone should voraciously inbibe ideas - music, books, dance, art, polictics, religion, quantum physics, biology. If we cannot understand we can never empathize, and if we cannot empathize with other human beings we can never progress. Growing up white, middle class and intellectual (as well as over seas) I didn't believe that racism still existed in the united states until I entered highschool in TN. And then someone started talking about the klan and I freaked out; ever since I've been a huge fan of Jay-z, Nas etc. Artists that came from a place and a sub-culture so different from the one in which I grew up. Because up until that point I had been part of the problem I have to be part of the solution. It's important to understand. it's important to fight the stereotypes. It is imperative to see the lies of culture, and to denounce them with truth. I am going to buy this album. Thanks for the heads up.
bob.bee.buzz's picture

yo i luv the open mindedness!!! i am kinda the same way. i can go from such extremes from nina simon to muddy waters to mumford and son to lupe(of course) to some old scarface to kreayshawn.(new female mc from oakland..kinda hot check it out on you tube). i flow myself and to create music is such a process and challenge. so if you create something more then likely its got a piece of you, your heart soul blood sweat and tears!!! so keep a open mind expand your playlist people!! you may find a new favorite artist everytime!! yo peace oh yeah loving the new out of my head video was just watchin on mtv..... bob,be.buzzin....on new music
desinii's picture

i remember lisinin to daydream wen i was in middleschool it was crazy cuz i didnt kno it was lupe until last year n really liked dee song so much too it was mah favorite. the arts impact mah life so much so that for a while it was all there was.. im 18 n the music today doesnt relate i mean i was homeless n abused n pushed around witin dee system n all i had was music n art so wen i lisin to dee songs today wher every rapper has no flow n pop music pushes everyone to focus on sum bull like las friday night im tinkin like wow none of dis is me... i have so much love for the underground it helped me realize that mah pain is shared and dee only ting we all need is for society to realize tht cuz mah pain is mah brothers pain mah sisters pain too n all we need is for ppk to reach out ther hand n to teach. i hope dat lupe holds his mic like a memory
SHARKEY's picture

@MR.HEZ Lupe don't need wishy wash fans just like he don't need fans that kiss his ass and don't have enough love to criticize certain things that don't make any sense. If I didn't love Lupe, I wouldn't be on his site right now trying to figure out what is him and what is the paycheck talking. This is also the first time I'm speaking out on this shit. I backed Lupe 100% during Lasers and everything. I'm mostly just blowin' off steam thats been pent up since the show goes on. I'm gonna buy F&L 2 when it comes out. Until then, I'm gonna try to ignore everything.
Mr. Mandingo69's picture

I just recently heard Lil B's latest shit, and u know what the content on there itll surprise you compared to his past shit. its nothing like his past garbage. Its still obvious that hes not the best rapper/flow in the world but his message is still real powerful nevertheless. # Respectable So all yall being lil bitches bout what Lupe has to say about him, yall should probably listen to it first. #Cant wait for F&L2 to drop.
Mr.Hez's picture

Honestly I hope you so-called fans who shun lupe now for the OBVIOUSLY APPARENT ATLANTIC RECORDS ALBUM, WITH LUPES VOICE ON IT, DONT come running back wit your tail between ya legs when Food an Liquor 2 comes out. WE DONT NEED WISHY WASH FANS. And did u even give Lil b's songs a damned listen???? http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O03LoqCqDBo Listen to it first....Dare i say, Lupe may have known about the content of this album waaaaaaaay before he wrote this post. He has been supporting him for a while now. I hated Lil b but i checked it out and i was shocked at his albums content. AND STOP ACTING LIKE LUPE WAS BORN A SAINT!!! YA DONT REMEMBER "ACCEPT THE TROUBLES"??? oh , oh yea...Yall must be the fans from food and liquor and/or just the cool... Stop being so close minded.... Mr.H - https://www.facebook.com/MrH3z
SHARKEY's picture

You can be famous and still stick to your guns. Look at Rage Against the Machine. Lupe traded fans that really connected with his lyrics for a bunch of "fly by night" fickle ass niggas. I'm losing respect everytime he gives Diggy or Lil B a shout out. He's letting his label dress him and give him haircuts. They tryin to make an "icon" that would be immensely lucrative for them. I ain't buying this bullshit. I ain't buying the shit material and bought hooks. Lupe was my last hope for new-ish artists. Oh well, http://www.mediafire.com/?o4z4ebht1gettlh Here's the link to Lil B's album that he gave out for free. If you think about it, he kind of won. If one of us listens to this shit, then he did a good job promoting a c*** talentless shit rapper, that threatened to fuck Kanye West in the ass on twitter. Bend over Lu, and get the dick that I thought maybe you'd be real enough to avoid. If this album is great on the other hand (which I highly doubt) then you deserve my sincere apology.
Mr. Mandingo69's picture

I agree with the comments below and to me or anyone who is a fan of good/meaning full/or just real and felt music, from listening to Lil B past work shits just straight garbage. Something that Lupe points out in his review. But thats why i cant really state an opinion on how Lupe feels about this im Gay album. Because unlike Lupe i havent heard it yet. And according to him its suppose to be different and surprisingly being meaningful. So untill i hear it i cant really be that critical about Lupe's likes or opinions on this. And that should go for all yall below. But when i hear it and if what Lupes saying turns out to be a WTF?? Then ill just be SMH with the rest of you.
CayJ's picture

@SHOFF35 And I don't make money off of music? Man, you don't know me. Also, what's your definition of "made it"? Selling your soul to make a little money?...I felt the need to call him out because I am not a pigeon. I see Lupe supporting and jocking an artist that contradicts what he says and stands for, so I call him out. You never question what doesn't make sense or is messed up to you? Also, please referring to me as ignorant. I didn't ask you to copy something from wiki, then proceed to call me ignorant without a justification again. Tell me what was ignorant. Also, stop talking about my grammar, I dont care how my grammar or spelling looks on a stupid ass message board, so chill out with that homeboy.
shoff35's picture

@sharkey ok look. i respect lupe and ill admit lasers was a bit of a sell out but still a good amount of the songs in that album had good meaning behind them. i too have listened to all of lupe's music including japanese cartoon and lupe is trying hard not to seel out, in my opinion however when you become so famous it is very difficult to not appear to be a sell out because in todays music if you are mainstream your are considered a sell out. which is good and bad depending on how you look at it. but at the end of the day. hes got a lot of money in his pocket, so if that makes him a sell out then okay he's a sell out but his music is still good and it deserves respect...
SHARKEY's picture

@SHOFF35 You said that you respect Lupe for saying he likes Lil B because he makes money off it. I thought maybe, just maybe, Lupe Fiasco, who I have been a big fan of, wouldn't sell-out that easily. For him to say that Lil B's revolutionary mentality is as powerful and meaningful as Immortal Technique and Dead Prez is offensive to them, and to me that he would even go there. (P.3, L. 7-9) People who pull the whole, "I'm a real fan and the people losing respect are not a real fans FNF UP!!! OHH", are just fooling themselves. I took a different route. Out Of My Head?? I was like "Oh Atlantic Records is making him do it. Poor Lupe Poor Lupe." Fuck that. It's all about the money and I've got close to no one to confide in anymore in the music industry. You can give me as much shit as you want, but if YOU believe anything that Lupe says in his music, then it is YOUR responsibility to call someone out when they are being fake. I listened to all of the Fahrenheit 1/15 mixtapes, F&L, The Cool, the Japanese Cartoon EP, and Lasers. I was at his concert at Roseland. I couldn't have been more of a fan. I'll pick up F&L II no matter what, but I ain't liking this stuff man.
shoff35's picture

@cayj first off i choose to respect Lupe over you because he made it, he actually makes money for this kind of thing. you are some kid on the internet who thinks hes smarter than everyone when in reality you are ignorant (Lacking education or knowledge. 2. Showing or arising from a lack of education or knowledge: an ignorant mistake.3. Unaware or uninformed.) and simply dislike Lil and Lupe likes him so you felt the need to call him out for that? that's what i have a problem with. And if Lupe likes it that doesn't mean i like it. it is apparent to me that until Lupe put this up you liked everything Lupe did but now that he likes something you don't, his music is off limits to you.... and your idiotic pigeon analogy and lack of grammatical skill makes you much less credible.
IL's picture

We need more of this type of music, because it gets back to the roots of it all. Rap is modern day poetry without the silly cliche's about love (of course there are a few trite topics but that's alright), and I think that when an artist embraces that persona, real music is made. Lupe did a wonderful job reviewing this album and I think it certainly does it justice.
BlackPhantom's picture

You made an amazing point there. (Sorry to be nit-picky but, add Rage Against the Machine and Nirvana to that "Liberation Rock" genre)
BasedBro's picture

ANYONE hating on B or lupe for their thoughts need to GO RIGHT NOW and listen to I'm Gay. The folks calling him garbage SERIOUSLY don't understand ANYTHING this kid puts out. Lupe's words were spot on. AND i don't say you don't understand because i want to call you stupid - but because you truly, honestly, have no idea what you're talking about. the impression Lil B could make on HIP HOP and your communities if you'd just release your closed minded heads from your bound, tight ASSHOLES, the impact would be phenomenal. take the time to hear I'm Gay for what it's worth, not everything he puts out is cooking music, not everything he puts out is "SWAG, SWAG". listen deeper than his most well known tracks and you'd know this. believe me, i thought he was crazy when i first heard wonton soup. i called him untalented too. he's not the most conscience rapper out there, but you all have no idea what you're missing. :/ and it makes me sad so many people don't give him a chance because of how quickly they pass judgment. it's a sad society we live in.
Hakeem S.'s picture

I understand the fact that you're trying to bring up the youth but you have to have some sort of boundries. When rappers come out sayin stuff like "hoes on my dick kuz i look like Jesus" in one song, then callind yourself the devil and a fag in another song, your're contradicting the very youth that you're trying to support. I like artists from they Bay area too like Locksmith. Also, im sure you're aware that music speaks to peoples subconscious. What kind of message is Lil B trying to put out there by saying dumb shit like that? You have to dismiss your biases so that you can s ee the actual truths, being that Lil B is trash and in order for hip hop to return to how it was back in the day we have to do away with and stop excepting garbagness from these up and coming rappers or things will only get worse.
CayJ's picture

@SHOFF35 What are you talking about. What in my post was ignorant? Do you know the meaning of that word? I've tried to listen to Lil B back in the day, he is complete garbage. I don't dislike Lupe any less because of his "taste in music," if you wanna call it that, (it's rap music like everyone else, except its completely garbage, and for all the terrible things I've heard in rap music, nothing has actually been repulsive to me except for Lil B). I dislike Lupe less because he's analyzing things that are not there, in order to support such a terrible artist. So you choose to respect a internationally famous rapper over me because what? Do you know me, do you know the people I've met in my life? Lupe is no better than me or you. Its cool though, like so many others you are incapable of thinking for yourself. If Lupe likes it, you like it. Your just a pigeon, so please stay in your lane.
shoff35's picture

@ Cayj... Why are you on here criticizing Lupe Fiasco's taste in music? Just because you like Lupe and you dislike Lil B doesn't mean Lupe has to dislike him as well. in all honesty your just making Lupe and Lil B more popular by posting this unnecessary hate after Lupe typed up this piece about a kid speaking how he feels. if you disagree then why are you wasting your time on this site, reading this thread, and proceeding to post an incredibly useless and incredibly ignorant comment? And hes making a big deal out of this rapper because in his opinion he does, in fact, show dedication to his craft and his lyrics are not garbage. My apologies if you happen to disagree with one of the most intelligent musicians in hip hop today, on one small subject. oh and his title. have you thought, that maybe he did that to get people talking? No shit Sherlock... more buzz= more hits. more ignorant haters like you= more hits... And maybe you should consider the fact that you haven't spent enough time analyzing the lyrics and album title. Truthfully I'm going to respect a internationally famous rapper over some person on the internet going around hating on peoples posts.
CayJ's picture

Wow Lupe, your starting to confuse me. I liked you because you always beat to your own drummer, and don't follow what everybody else is doing, and always speak the real. You talk about things that have real substance, and stuff that really matters. Now you come out with an album much lower than expectations, then blame the label, and now your sayn Lil B is good. Lil B is garbage. I love music maybe even more than you, and I have listened to almost everything, from heavy metal to gangsta rap and the one artist that I cannot swallow is Lil B. So why are you making a big deal about a rapper who has a "happy go lucky dance" that symbolizes cooking crack, a rapper who spits lines like "hoes on my dick cuz I look like Jesus." An artist that shows no dedication to his craft, shown by his consistently garbage lyrics, in regards to content and lyrical ability? Oh because he says "THE HOOD IS A LIE." Um, I dont know how much rap you listen to, but I've heard this line several times before. Go listen to some of Gucci Mane's old stuff, listen to anybody, he probably stole it from someone. Oh, and is album title, have you thought, that maybe he did that to get people talking? All you have done is over analyzed an artists lyrics and album title to make into something he probably didn't mean for it to be. As a result you are starting to lose respect from me and probably many other Lupe fans that have ever listened to Lil B.
ColeWorld0154's picture

LMAO @ a quality artist like lupe feeling lil b. This dude is making a mockery of my favorite form of music and he's a joke. LIL B is garbage and I could care less what anyone thinks about him even if its one of my favorite rappers..

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